Posts Tagged ‘Asylum Seekers’

violence

This cartoon is from the Financial Review.

You can listen to this episode above and subscribe to our podcast on iTunes. You can also listen to this episode on StitcherCyber Ears or download it on Archive.org (61mins, 41MB).

Nick is joined by Kathryn Joy for this entire episode. The first half of the episode is a critical look at the feminist campaign calling for American singer Chris Brown to be denied entry into Australia because of his conviction for assaulting his ex-girlfriend, Rhianna. We draw on Nick’s article ‘Don’t judge me: Chris Brown and the real task of tackling violence against women’, Clem Bastow’s article ‘The Problem with the Ban Against Chris Brown’ and Katie Robertson’s article ‘Violence Against Women In Australia, Bad; Violence Against Women In The Care Of Australia, Acceptable’ (content warning for discussion of sexual violence).

GetUp

We also discuss GetUp! cancelling their campaign against Brown and apologising due to the racist narrative it perpetuated, Maori support for Brown, his (court ordered) involvement with domestic violence intervention services, misogynist lyrics in Brown’s music, his ongoing problematic behaviour that suggests he may not have changed, as well as a more general discussion on whether the feminist movement should ever support restrictions on immigration – not just for Brown but in general (such as against sexist pick up artist Julien Blanc).

In the second half of the episode we discuss some critiques of identity politics, which emphasises the importance of personal experience. We draw on Michael Brull’s article ‘The Debate we have to have: Identity Politics and the Left’ and discuss how identity politics fits with a range of other issues, including intersectionality, same-sex marriage and sex work.

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Clips:

Jeffrey Lewis and the RainWWPRD’, Aamer RahmanPeople Have a Right to be Bigots’, PortlandiaSeries 5, Episode 7’ – ‘Feminist Men Meeting’, Strike AnywhereAllies’.

You can listen to a short (10 minute) version of this episode, which features a shortened version of the discussion on the campaign against Chris Brown, below. You can subscribe to these short versions of our episodes through Omny.

no-peace-without-justice

Image from: asthedeerthirsts.wordpress.com

You can listen to this episode above and subscribe to our podcast on iTunes. You can also listen to this episode on StitcherCyber Ears or download it on Archive.org (55mins, 40MB).

This episode features an interview with Samah Sabawi, a Palestinian Australian Canadian writer and human rights advocate. She discusses the ongoing oppression Palestinian people face, even when the bombs are not dropping and most of the media is ignoring the issue. To learn more about this topic, she recommends people look into: bdsmovement.net, electronicintifada.net and palestinechronicle.com. You can find out more about the BDS conference she will be speaking about here. You can also listen to our previous episodes on this issue – episodes 16, 62 and 63 and read Nick’s article ‘A Response to Sam Harris Blaming Muslims for the “Careful” and “Compassionate” Killing of Palestinian Civilians’.

Samah Sabawi also leaves us with her powerful poem ‘Red Shirt. Blue Jeans’ (embedded below) about Aylan Kurdi, the Syrian toddler who recently drowned, sparking changing discussions about asylum seekers. We discuss this further, mentioning that the image of this boy and the EU refugee crisis generally have led to very different discussions and policies towards asylum seekers in Australia. We refer to Waleed Aly’s video from The Project on the EU Refugee crisis and we also mention Tad Tietze’s article looking into who is to blame for harsh refugee policies in Australia – politicians or the public? For further analysis of the EU refugee crisis, check out RTRFM Indymedia (7/9/15 episode).

If you like what you hear, please support the show!

Clips:

Serj Tankian ‘Occupied Tears’, Nick’s interview with Samah Sabawi on Palestine, Ambassador MCFree Palestine’, Samah SabawiRed Shirt. Blue Jeans‘ (embedded below).

You can listen to a short (4 minute) version of this episode, which features Samah Sabawi’s poem ‘Red Shirt, Blue Jeans’, about Aylan Kurdi, the Syrian toddler who recently drowned, sparking changing discussions about asylum seekers, below. You can subscribe to these short versions of our episodes through Omny.

Nick's message of support queer refugees

Nick’s message of support for queer refugees. This picture was taken at the End Queer Lockdown on Manus Island stall where Nick met Aaron and we set up this discussion.

Listen to this episode and subscribe to our podcast on iTunes. You can also listen to this episode on StitcherCyber Ears or download it on Archive.org (41 mins, 23MB). 

Nick is joined by Aaron from End Queer Lockdown on Manus Island for the entire episode. We discuss the intersections between queer and refugee issues, with the Australian government’s policies such as “offshore processing” of asylum seekers harming refugees as a whole, but queer refugees in particular. We also read a letter from a queer refugee, discuss refugee activism and the importance of individual stories in changing attitudes, violence and/or the threat of violence preventing people’s free movement around the world, Emma Goldman’s ‘Patriotism: A Menace to Liberty’, and punk rock music and social change.

If you like what you hear, please support the show!

Clips:

Anti-FlagI’d tell you but’, Rise AgainstBehind Closed Doors’, Simon Taylor ‘What an Amazing Journey’ – from the album ‘Funny’, Rage Against the Machine ‘War within a Breath’.

You can listen to a short (7 minute) version of this episode, which features our opening discussion on the Australian government’s policies towards queer refugees and what we can do to stand up against these policies, below. You can subscribe to these short versions of our episodes through Omny.

Look after this bear

This is our meme – in the notes below we’ve provided links to share it around on Facebook and Twitter.

Listen to this episode and subscribe to our podcast on iTunes. You can also listen to this episode on StitcherCyber Ears or download it on Archive.org (38MB). 

On this episode we discuss themes of refugee rights and animal rights in the Paddington movie. We discuss the article ‘Why the new Paddington movie is really an asylum seeker story’, read a review of the movie from an immigration lawyer, as well as promoting the Free Paddington Facebook page by the Refugee Rights Action Network (RRAN) and the #FreePaddington hashtag. In our discussion on Paddington and animal rights, we encouraged people to watch the video ‘Death Row’, which shows the fear animals face before they are slaughtered, in a non-graphic way.

We have done a few memes relating to the movie, which we encourage people to share around. You can share around our meme on Paddington and refugees (pictured above) on Facebook and Twitter. We also saw a great pro-migrant Paddington meme, which we encourage people to share on Facebook and Twitter. You can also share our meme on the Paddington movie and adopting companion animals on Facebook and Twitter.

We start off the episode by discussing the horrible new laws regarding asylum seekers that our government has introduced (yet again!). For analysis of these laws, check out the Guardian, New Matilda and ChilOut. We also mention the opposition to the new laws from Jacqui Lambie and other Senators.

Other stuff covered is: getting active for refugees, incrementally moving towards a borderless world, Karl Stefanovic becomes a ‘social justice warrior’ and takes down Abbott, the campaign against the East-West Link is successful, and the true meaning of the Washington Redskins.

If you like what you hear, please support the show!

Clips:

Senator Sarah-Hanson YoungThe Immigration Minister is a Sociopath’, The PresetsMy People, Paddington  preview, Legally Brown ‘Series 1, Episode 8’, Austin PowersBBC World ServiceThe True Meaning of the Washington Redskins’, Serj TankianBorders Are…’.

You can listen to a short (7 minute) version of this episode, which features our closing discussion on gradually moving towards the free movement of people around the world, here: Incrementally Moving Towards A Borderless World. You can subscribe to these short versions of our episodes through Omny.